Investigación | LAMRI

Investigación | LAMRI



¿QUÉ ES LAMRI?
 |  INVESTIGACIÓN  |  EVENTOS Y NOTICIAS  |  LAMRI EN LOS MEDIOS
................................................................................................................................................................


Artículos en revistas arbitradas

  • Queirolo, R., García-Sánchez, M.  2020. "A Tale of Two Countries: The Effectiveness of List Experiments to Measure Drug Consumption in Opposite Contexts". International Journal of Public Opinion Research, edaa031 (Published 10 December 2020).

  • Queirolo, R., Pardal, M., Bone, M., Decorte, T., Parés, O., Johansson, J., Álvarez, E., Repetto, L. 2020. "Hidden and uninterested populations: Methodological insights and unresolved issues from the study of Cannabis Social Clubs". Methodological Innovations. Volume: 13 issue: 3 (first published online: November 30, 2020).

  • Queirolo, R. 2020. "The Effects of Recreational Cannabis Legalization Might Depend Upon the Policy Model" (Comments section). World Psychiatry, Volume 19 Issue 2. June 2020.

  • Pardal, M.; Queirolo, R; Álvarez, E. y L. Repetto. (Forthcoming) "Uruguayan Cannabis Social Clubs: from Activism to Dispensaries?" International Journal of Drug Policy
    In 2013 Uruguay regulated three models for the supply of cannabis for recreational use (Law 19.172), including Cannabis Social Clubs (CSCs). According to the Cannabis Regulation and Control Institute, 110 CSCs are active at the time of writing. This paper has a twofold goal. Firstly, it aims to take stock of how the CSC model has continued to be implemented in practice, drawing on the first-hand accounts of those involved in its management. Secondly, our analysis seeks to contribute to the understanding of the CSC model by considering the different variants of the model that have emerged in Uruguay. Our analysis draws on qualitative research conducted in Uruguay between June and October of 2018. We conducted 15 semi-structured and face-to-face interviews with representatives of registered Uruguayan CSCs and with 13 other stakeholders. CSCs’ role as cannabis suppliers is perceived positively in terms of the type of cannabis produced and the means of distribution. We found that truly social CSCs coexist with, and may be losing ground to, quasi-dispensary clubs. A number of factors may have contributed to this, including the Uruguayan regulatory framework, institutional context, and disengagement of members and/or CSC managers. This raises potential new challenges as to the contribution of the CSC model from a harm reduction perspective.

  • Cruz, J. M., Boidi, M. F., & Queirolo, R. (2018). The status of support for cannabis regulation in Uruguay 4 years after reform: Evidence from public opinion surveys. Drug and alcohol review, 37, S429-S434.
    Introduction and Aims: The objective of this study was to measure the public support for marijuana legalization in Uruguay, both overall and in its provisions, in nearly 4 years after its implementation. Design and Methods: Three separate cross‐national surveys were conducted in early 2014, late 2015 and mid‐2017 with national representative samples of adults. The first study was carried out during the initial months of implementation of the law and used face‐to‐face interviews (N = 1490); the second survey was conducted using a computer‐assisted telephone interviewing system (N = 703); and the third study (N = 1515), using face‐to‐face interviews, was completed just before the implementation of pharmacy sales. Results: About 60.7% of respondents in 2014 were against marijuana legalization; in 2017, 54.1% remained opposed to the marijuana law. In 2015, half of the people interviewed (49.9%) supported access to marijuana through self‐cultivation, while 38.6% favored the provision of cannabis clubs and 33.1% agreed with the pharmacy retail provision. Support for medical cannabis was high in 2015, with 74.5% favoring it. Discussion and Conclusions: This study shows a change in the public opinion toward legalizations of marijuana although most people still remain opposed to the law. However, the data do not provide indication of a significant change in its use. Results suggest that opposition to legalizations may be focused on the pharmacy retail provision.

  • Queirolo, R., Rossel, C., Álvarez, E., & Repetto, L. (2018). Why Uruguay legalized marijuana? The open window of public insecurity. Addiction. Why Uruguay legalized marijuana? The open window of public insecurity.
    In 2013, Uruguay became the first country in the world fully to regulate its marijuana market. This ambitious policy was also an unexpected one: none of the usual explanations for legalization of marijuana in other contexts was present in the Uruguayan case. This paper offers an explanation for why Uruguay legalized marijuana. Drawing on Kingdon's theoretical approach, we argue that a window of opportunity opened in mid‐2012, making it both necessary and possible for the government to move towards legalization. A congruence case study using evidence from a series of interviews with political actors and policy makers, media reports, and official documents. There is evidence that marijuana legalization was possible in Uruguay because of the coincidence of a demand for more public safety (problem stream) with the presence of pro‐legalization leaders in strategic political positions (policy stream) and a favorable political environment (political stream).

  • Coitiño, M., Queirolo, R., Triñanes, A. (2017) Dos drogas, diferentes mensajes: los medios y la regulación de la marihuana y el alcohol en Uruguay. Revista Contratexto
    Recientemente, Uruguay reguló el mercado de la marihuana y discutió la regulación del mercado del alcohol. La regulación de la marihuana es una política que recibe más rechazos que aprobaciones en la opinión pública uruguaya (Boidi, Queirolo y Cruz, 2016a); en cambio, la regulación del mercado del alcohol cuenta con una mayoría absoluta de aprobaciones (Cifra, 2015). ¿Por qué dos regulaciones discutidas en el mismo momento histórico reciben tan diferente apoyo por parte de la ciudadanía? ¿Es posible que la cobertura que hacen los medios sobre la política de regulación del alcohol sea positiva, mientras que la cobertura de la regulación de la marihuana sea mayormente negativa? Este trabajo responde esta pregunta analizando la cobertura mediática de los principales medios de prensa escritos de Uruguay sobre ambas regulaciones, con el objetivo de identificar cuáles son los encuadres predominantes en los medios y las diferencias en el tratamiento de ambas regulaciones.

  • Decorte T., Pardal M., Queirolo R., Boidi M., Sánchez Avilés C., Parés Franquero O. 2017. Regulating Cannabis Social Clubs: A comparative analysis of legal and self-regulatory practices in Spain, Belgium and UruguayInternational Journal of Drug Policy.

  • Boidi, M. F., Queirolo, R., & Cruz, J. M. 2016. Marijuana Consumption Patterns among Frequent Consumers in Uruguay.  International Journal of Drug Policy.
    Este artículo presenta los resultados de la encuesta Respondent Driven Sample sobre 249 consumidores frecuentes de Montevideo y el área metropolitana. Estos consumidores declaran obtener el cannabis a través de más de un método, siendo el ilegal todavía el más predominante de ellos inclusive a más de un año de la nueva reglamentación.

  • Cruz, J. M., Queirolo, R., & Boidi, M. F., 2016. Determinants of Public Support for Marijuana Legalization in Uruguay, the United States, and El Salvador. Journal of Drug Issues.
    ¿Cuáles son los determinantes del apoyo popular a la legalización de la marihuana? En los últimos tres años, Uruguay y los estados de Colorado y Washington han legalizado la producción, venta y consumo recreacional de la marihuana. A través de un modelo de regresión logística con datos del Barómetro de las Américas 2014, encuesta realizada a nivel nacional en Uruguay, Estados Unidos y El Salvador, el artículo examina las visiones ciudadanas sobre la regularización de la marihuana y los determinantes individuales para su apoyo. Los resultados subrayan el rol de las variables socio-políticas en aquellos países donde la legalización ha estado en debate.

  • Queirolo, R, Boidi, Cruz, J. M., 2016. Cannabis Clubs in Uruguay: the Challenges of Regulation. International Journal of Drug Policy.
    Los Clubes Cannábicos Uruguayos (UCCs por su sigla en inglés) constituyen una de las tres formas de obtener cannabis con la nueva regulación. El artículo describe el funcionamiento de estos clubes y los desafíos que enfrentan a partir de entrevistas en profundidad con representantes de los UCCs y conversaciones con autoridades gubernamentales. La información recolectada refiere a las membresías, las formas de organización, los métodos de producción y distribución del cannabis, y las actividades comunitarias.

  • Rosario Queirolo con José Miguel Cruz y María Fernanda Bodi "Saying No to Weed: Public Opinion toward Cannabis Legalization in Uruguay" Drugs: Education, Prevention & Policy.


Informes Lamri


Capítulo de libro

  • Rosario Queirolo “Uruguay: the first country to legalize cannabis” En Decorte, T., Lenton, S., Wilkins, C. Legalizing cannabis. Experiences, lessons and scenarios. Routledge Publishers.

  • Inventando Caminos—Cannabis Regulation in Uruguay (Arrarás and Bello-Pardo, 2014, en Rosen y Zepeda)
    Resumen: "Este capítulo examinará la regulación del cannabis en Uruguay así como su impacto nacional e internacional. Más específicamente, dará respuestas a las siguientes preguntas: ¿cuál es la naturaleza de la legalización de la marihuana en Uruguay? ¿Cómo se ajusta al régimen internacional de control de drogas y otros intentos de regulación en el mundo? ¿Cuál serán las posibles repercusiones nacionales e internacionales derivadas de la regulación de la marihuana en Uruguay? Nuestro argumento es que el camino uruguayo a la legalización es un experimento complejo e incierto. Aún así, la legalización de la marihuana en Uruguay ha profundizado el debate internacional sobre políticas de drogas. Este capítulo está dividido en cinco secciones. En la primera, realizamos un mirada general sobre diferentes modelos de políticas de drogas adoptados por los países. Segundo, describimos el marco internacional de regulación de sustancias controladas. Tercero, analizamos el entorno y contexto de la ley de la legalización de la marihuana. Cuarto, analizamos los desafíos domésticos y las implicancias internacionales de la legalización de la marihuana en Uruguay. Finalmente, realizamos un conclusión.” Leer artículo completo

Presentaciones en Congresos

The Impact of Marijuana Sale at Pharmacies on Crime. A natural experiment. El impacto de la venta de marihuana en farmacias en crímenes; un experimento natural

Artículo presentado en la 13° Conferencia de The International Society for the Study of Drug Policy (ISSDP) París (Francia), entre el 22 y el 24 de mayo de 2019 Autora: Lorena Repetto

Resumen: This paper presents preliminary results of a natural experiment that aims to evaluate the impact that recreational marijuana sale at pharmacies have on crime, on particular on violent crime (homicides and assaults and property crime (robberies). It does so using an “as if random” observational design in which the “treatment” is the closeness to a marijuana selling pharmacy, and the control group is comprised by the non-selling pharmacies. The evidence of the impact that legal marijuana dispensaries have on crime is mixed. Braakmann and Jones (2014) find no significant relationship between medical marijuana laws and crime, neither Chu and Townsend (2019) at national level in U.S. But some research brings evidence of a significant impact of the marijuana dispensaries on some kind of crimes, for example, Brinkman and Mok-Lamme (2017) found that crimes decreases on in the neighbors which have more marijuana dispensaries, similar to the findings of Dragone et al. (2018) for some type of crimes also in the U.S. Most of the evidence comes from experimental or quasi-experimental designs in the United States, where the crime national trend shows a decrease in crime rates (Dragone et al., 2018). On the contrary, in Uruguay the crime rates shows a sustained growth, especially on the last 5 five years. So, our main hypothesis is that crime should report an increase both in the neighbors surrounding both treatment and control pharmacies, but we expect crime growth in treatment pharmacies to be lower than in control pharmacies. We test this hypothesis using data from the Home Office, before and after pharmacies started to sell marijuana. Data is analyzed by differences in differences (DD) to estimate the causal effect before and after the implementation of the marijuana regulation. We found no significant differences to confirm our main hypothesis, but while the results are still preliminary, we adventure some possible steps to follow to sharp our results. While we cannot pin down the mechanisms behind these effects, we follow Dragone et al. (2018) to discuss what mechanisms we believe are most likely to be operating in the Uruguayan context.

 

The Impact of Marijuana Sale at Pharmacies on Users Stigmatization, Law Approval, Insecurity Perceptions and Crime Victimization El impacto de la venta de marihuana en farmacias en la estigmatización de los usuarios, la aprobación de la ley, las percepciones de inseguridad y la victimización por crimen

Artículo presentado en la 13° Conferencia de The International Society for the Study of Drug Policy (ISSDP) París (Francia), entre el 22 y el 24 de mayo de 2019 Autores: Rosario Queirolo, Jake Bowers, Eliana Álvarez, Lorena Repetto

Resume: Background: In 2017, recreational marijuana sale at pharmacies started all over Uruguay´s jurisdiction, with only a few pharmacies voluntarily adhered. This was the third mechanism of acquisition implemented -besides cannabis social clubs and self-cultivation- but the only one that places marijuana sale in a public environment: the pharmacy. This special feature forces contact between marijuana users and non-users as they meet in a common place, so it is expected to have an effect on social norms and non-users’ perceptions and attitudes. It is also expected to have an impact on insecurity perceptions and crime, as they were one of the main issues to promote regulation as well as one of the main arguments used against legalization. Objectives and hypotheses: This paper evaluates the impact of marijuana sales at pharmacies on a set of outcomes: users’ stigmatization, law approval, insecurity perceptions and crime victimization. Our hypothesis is that social contact will reduce users’ stigmatization, increase law approval and reduce citizens’ insecurity perception but will not have an impact on crime victimization. Method: We use an “as if random” observational design (natural experiment) in which the “treatment” is living close to a marijuana selling pharmacy. Control group is comprised by neighbors of a non-selling pharmacy. We performed two surveys, one before and one after the implementation of the selling at pharmacies. The sample is composed by 1.298 neighbors of 64 pharmacies in all the territory, 10 or more neighbors per pharmacy in each round. Through a computational matching, the results are analyzed by clusters of similar pharmacies, which allows fine-tuning the effects on the expected outcomes. These outcomes included Public Stigma Index, Stigmatization Index, law approval, country’s insecurity perception, neighborhood’s insecurity perception, and crime victimization in the last twelve months. Data is analyzed using a difference in differences model. Results: The results provide evidence on how drug legalizations -in this case, through the social contact between users and non-users at pharmacies-, can influence attitudes and opinions toward the substance, its users and the law and its impacts.


Marijuana risk perception and consumption levels: a natural experiment with the pharmacies sales mechanism in Uruguay La percepción de riesgo y el consumo de marihuana: un experimento natural con la venta de marihuana en farmacias en Uruguay

Artículo presentado en la 13° Conferencia de The International Society for the Study of Drug Policy (ISSDP) París (Francia), entre el 22 y el 24 de mayo de 2019 Autora: Eliana Álvarez

Resume: Background: In 2013 Uruguay became the first country in the world in fully regulate the cannabis market with three mechanism of acquisition: home growing, cannabis clubs and sales at pharmacies. At that time, national data on drug consumption showed that marijuana was the fourth most used drug, after alcohol, tobacco and tranquilizers. Four years later, marijuana began to be sold at pharmacies. Even though just a few pharmacies joined the sale, this mechanism is the only one that sets the substances and its consumers in a public and common place, where they normally interact with non-consumers. In this context, the attitudes, opinions and perceptions regarding marijuana may be altered. Objectives: This research proposes to assess the impact of the marijuana sales at pharmacies in its use and risk perception. Literature poses that a more favorable context and a bigger availability may drop risk perception and rise consumption. However, evidence has not been conclusive about these trends and how legalization may affect them. Having marijuana being sold at pharmacies produces a special opportunity to test this. First, the idea of its availability and safe access could rise use. This, combined with regular interaction between consumers and non-consumers, could develop a normalization process where the idea that it is not a risky drug may grow. Method: The research design consists in a natural experiment where neighbors of selling pharmacies are the treatment group and the neighbors of non-selling pharmacies are the control group. Groups of neighbors were selected because it is assume they are distributed randomly, as decision of selling marijuana or not had nothing to do with them. Mean tests on outcomes and control variables confirm this. Two surveys were conducted; the first one was in June of 2017 when the sale had not started yet and the second in August of 2018, a year later. In total, 1.298 neighbors were interviewed. To estimate the impact of the treatment, differences in differences were conducted. Results: Results show a significant impact of the policy in the lifetime use, but no significant impacts in marijuana frequency of use in the last 12 months. In the same direction, no impact was detected in risk perceptions. However, the time turns out to be significant in the cases of risk perception.

 

Uruguayan Cannabis Social Clubs: from activism to dispensaries? 
Clubes cannábicos uruguayos: ¿de activismo a dispensación?

Artículo presentado en el Cinco Años de la Regulación del Cannabis de la Facultad de Ciencias Sociales
Montevideo (Uruguay), entre el 10 y el 12 de diciembre de 2018
Autores: Mafalda Pardal, Rosario Queirolo y Eliana Álvarez y Lorena Repetto
 

Resumen: Introduction: Since December 2013, Uruguay became the first nationwide jurisdiction to have legalized and regulated three models for the supply of cannabis for recreational use (Law 19.172). Cannabis Social Clubs (CSCs) are one of the three supply models introduced by that reform, which defined a legal framework as to how CSCs are allowed to operate. For instance, it limits the number of members a CSC can enroll (15-45 members), the number of plants to be cultivated (99 plants), or the quantity of cannabis members can obtain per month/year (40gram/480gram), among other aspects of CSCs’ functioning. The number of registered CSCs, according to IRCCA’s reports, has continued to grow and at the time of writing a total of 104 are active in the country. Objectives: This paper builds on previous research from the authors (Queirolo et al., 2016; Pardal, 2018; Decorte et al., 2017) and has a twofold goal. Firstly, it aims to take stock of how the CSC model has continued to be implemented in practice, drawing on the first-hand accounts of those involved in its management: how have CSCs been organizing their activities? What are the key challenges and successful aspects that can be learned from the implementation of the CSC regulation so far? Secondly, our analysis seeks to contribute to the theoretical/conceptual understanding of the CSC model by considering the different variants of the CSC model that have emerged in Uruguay (e.g.: activist-oriented?; dispensary-like?; etc.), building on a classification developed by one of the authors (Pardal, 2018). Methodology: Our analysis draws on qualitative research conducted in Uruguay between June and September of 2018. In particular, we conducted (approximately) 15 semi-structured and face to face interviews with representatives of registered Uruguayan CSCs. Additional data was gathered through interviews and informal conversations with other stakeholders (n=12) engaged with policy-making, activism, research, or the cannabis industry. Relevant legislative pieces and other documentary sources were also included in our analysis. This data was thematically analysed using NVivo 11. Results/Conclusions: Our analysis shows that even within the relatively closed Uruguayan legal framework a variety of CSC practices has emerged. We describe the characteristics of the CSCs that took part in the study (i.e.: origin and motivations to set up a CSC; management and financial aspects; membership of a CSC; cultivation and distribution of cannabis; CSC representatives’ view of the development of the model and cannabis policy more broadly). We highlight a shift away from an initially more cooperative variant of the model towards other less ‘social’ forms. We discuss several emerging internal tensions or challenges of the model as implemented in Uruguay (e.g., the issue of ‘shared memberships’, access to tourists, ‘competing’ with the illicit market, etc.).


El impacto de la venta de marihuana en farmacias sobre la estigmatización de los usuarios y la aprobación de la regulación

Artículo presentado en el Cinco Años de la Regulación del Cannabis de la Facultad de Ciencias Sociales
Montevideo (Uruguay), entre el 10 y el 12 de diciembre de 2018
Autores: Rosario Queirolo, Eliana Álvarez, y Lorena Repetto (Universidad Católica del Uruguay), Jake Bowers (University of Illinois)

Resumen: El trabajo busca evaluar el impacto que tiene la cercanía con los consumidores de drogas en las actitudes y opiniones de los ciudadanos hacia los consumidores de marihuana y el modelo de regulación implementado en Uruguay en 2013, a partir de una metodología observacional de experimento natural.


Uruguayan Cannabis Social Clubs: from activism to dispensaries?
Clubes cannábicos uruguayos: ¿de activismo a dispensación?

Expendio en farmacias, seguridad pública y percepción de inseguridad. Evaluación de impacto de la política de regulación del cannabis en Uruguay
Artículo presentado en el Cinco Años de la Regulación del Cannabis de la Facultad de Ciencias Sociales
Montevideo (Uruguay), entre el 10 y el 12 de diciembre de 2018
Autora: Lorena Repetto

Resumen: Introducción: El vínculo causal entre crimen, violencia y drogas es un tema discutido en la literatura (White y Gorman, 2000; Gottfredson & Hirschi, 1990; McBride y McCoy, 1993; Brothers, 2003). Conocemos aún menos sobre el impacto que la legalización podría tener en los índices de criminalidad y la percepción de inseguridad debido a que hay poca evidencia disponible. En este trabajo se presentan los resultados preliminares de una investigación que indaga sobre los efectos de la regulación del cannabis en Uruguay en los índices de criminalidad, seguridad pública y percepciones de inseguridad. En particular, se propone evaluar el impacto de la venta en farmacias sobre estas variables, con un diseño que permita abordar estas relaciones en términos de causalidad, controlando el efecto entre un grupo de farmacias de tratamiento y otro de farmacias de control. Objetivos: Evaluar el impacto del expendio de cannabis de uso recreativo en farmacias sobre los índices de criminalidad y percepciones de inseguridad en las zonas cercanas a las farmacias. Metodología: La estrategia metodológica seleccionada consiste en un diseño de investigación observacional con aleatorización “as if random”, que implica la definición de una población de tratamiento y una de control. Se realizó una medición anterior al inicio de la venta en farmacias (julio de 2017) y una medición a un año del inicio de la venta (agosto 2018), en el grupo de tratamiento (cercanía a una farmacia que vende marihuana) y en el grupo de control (cercanía a farmacias que no venden). Los datos utilizados son datos de encuesta y datos del Observatorio de Violencia y Criminalidad del Ministerio del Interior. Resultados preliminares: Uno de los argumentos esgrimidos en contra de la venta de marihuana para uso recreativo en farmacias fue el argumento de la inseguridad. Si bien recién se ha comenzado a trabajar en el análisis de los datos, se espera que los niveles de delito y criminalidad no aumenten en las zonas cercanas a las farmacias que venden marihuana.


Los impactos de la tercera vía: percepción del riesgo y consumo de marihuana tras su comercialización en farmacias

Artículo presentado en el Cinco Años de la Regulación del Cannabis de la Facultad de Ciencias Sociales
Montevideo (Uruguay), entre el 10 y el 12 de diciembre de 2018
Autora: Eliana Álvarez

Resumen: Introducción: A partir de la dispensación de marihuana en farmacias que se instala en Uruguay en 2017, la última vía implementada de un modelo integral de producción y comercialización, la cercanía entre la sustancia, sus consumidores y la sociedad en general adquiere una nueva dimensión. Ahora estos dos públicos, consumidores y no consumidores, comparten un nuevo espacio de interacción cotidiana: la farmacia. ¿Cómo impacta este contacto en los niveles de consumo y la percepción de riesgo? La literatura supone que un contexto favorable y una mayor disponibilidad de la sustancia repercuten en una baja de los niveles de percepción del riesgo y un crecimiento del consumo. Sin embargo, esta información surge de estudios observacionales, en donde el “efecto contacto” no se puede aislar de las características personales de los individuos, sus grupos de pares, la información que poseen, etc. Objetivo e hipótesis: El objetivo general es observar el impacto de la venta de marihuana en farmacias en ambos indicadores, con una estrategia metodológica de experimento natural. De esta manera, se intenta superar algunas de las principales limitaciones de los estudios sobre este tema, asociadas a las características propias de los estudios observacionales. Las hipótesis principales de la investigación son esencialmente dos: i) la venta de marihuana en farmacias, aumentará la prevalencia de consumo de la sustancia, ii) la venta de marihuana en farmacias, disminuirá la percepción de riesgo sobre la misma. Metodología: Este trabajo propone analizar el comportamiento de estos dos indicadores a partir de una estrategia metodológica de experimento natural. La misma es posible gracias a la propia implementación de la política, de acuerdo a la cual la adhesión de las farmacias a la venta de cannabis es voluntaria. Entonces, aunque el tratamiento para las farmacias no sea aleatorio si no que depende de la decisión de ellas, el hecho de vivir cerca de una farmacia vendedora sí es una condición aleatoria (“as if random”). Por lo tanto, en este diseño el tratamiento es residir cerca de una farmacia vendedora marihuana, el grupo de tratamiento son los vecinos de las farmacias vendedoras, y el grupo de control los vecinos de farmacias no vendedoras. Se utilizan datos de dos encuestas implementadas por el proyecto LAMRI en junio de 2017 (previo al inicio de la venta en farmacias) y en agosto de 2018 (post inicio). El conjunto de farmacias encuestadas fue de 60 en la primera ronda y de 64 en la segunda. Se encuestó a 10 vecinos por cada farmacia, teniendo en total 600 casos en la línea de base (pre-venta) y 640 en la ronda más reciente (post-venta). El estudio cubrió todo el territorio nacional. Resultados/Conclusiones: Los resultados proporcionarán insumos valiosos para comprender el alcance y la magnitud del “efecto contacto” sobre dos indicadores centrales para esta esta política pública: el consumo y la percepción del riesgo. Además, permitirán comprender mejor cómo los marcos regulatorios inciden en la relación de la sociedad con las sustancias.


El impacto de la venta de marihuana en farmacias en la percepción de inseguridad y victimización por crimen

Artículo presentado en el Seminario SEPODRA-CESED en Colombia-Universidad de los Andes
Bogotá (Colombia), 7 de diciembre de 2018
Autores: Rosario Queirolo, Eliana Álvarez, y Lorena Repetto (Universidad Católica del Uruguay), Jake Bowers (University of Illinois)

Resumen: Este artículo presenta los primeros resultados de un proyecto que mide el impacto de la venta de marihuana en farmacias en la percepción de inseguridad, la victimización por crimen y la tasa de homicidios, hurtos y rapiñas experimentadas por los uruguayos. Utiliza un diseño observacional "como aleatorio" en el que el tratamiento es vivir cerca de una farmacia que vende marihuana, y el grupo de control está compuesto por vecinos de una farmacia que no vende marihuana. Nuestra principal hipótesis es que la proximidad a las farmacias que venden marihuana reducirá la percepción de inseguridad, pero no tendrá impacto en la victimización por crimen, ni en la tasa de homicidios, rapiñas y hurtos. Probamos estas hipótesis utilizando datos de dos encuestas. La encuesta de línea de base se realizó antes de que comenzara la venta de marihuana en las farmacias. La muestra está compuesta por 600 vecinos de 60 farmacias, 10 vecinos por farmacia en cada ronda. La segunda ronda se llevó a cabo en agosto del 2018 y está compuesta por 640 vecinos de 64 farmacias, también 10 vecinos por farmacia. Los datos se analizan realizando matching y prueba de diferencia de medias para estimar el efecto causal medio (antes y después de la implementación de la ley de regulación de marihuana).


Why Uruguay legalized marijuana? The open window of public insecurity.
¿Por qué Uruguay legalizó la marihuana? La ventana abierta por la inseguridad pública

Artículo presentado en el Seminario SEPODRA-CESED en Colombia-Universidad de los Andes
Bogotá (Colombia), 7 de diciembre de 2018
Autores: Rosario Queirolo, Cecilia Rossel, Eliana Álvarez y Lorena Repetto

Resumen: Background and aims: In 2013, Uruguay became the first country in the world to fully regulate its marijuana market. This ambitious policy was also an unexpected one: none of the usual explanations for legalization of marijuana in other contexts were present in the Uruguayan case. This paper offers an explanation to why Uruguay legalized marijuana. Basing on Kingdon’s theoretical approach, we argue that a window of opportunity opened in mid-2012, making both necessary and possible for the government to move towards legalization. Methods: Through a congruence case study, we empirically test our hypothesis as well as alternative explanations basing on evidence from a series of interviews with political actors and policy makers, media reports, and official documents. Results: We find evidence to sustain the theory that marijuana legalization was possible in Uruguay because of the coincidence of a demand for more public safety (problem stream) with the presence of pro-legalization leaders in strategic political positions (policy stream) and a favorable political environment (political stream) Conclusions: Kingdon’s theory of windows of opportunity is useful to account for what happened in the Uruguayan case. Despite the uniqueness of the case, lessons drawn from the Uruguayan path can be useful to shed light on why governments might be willing to legalize marijuana in contexts were support from the public opinion is limited or interests groups are not powerful enough.


El impacto de la venta de marihuana en farmacias en las opiniones y actitudes hacia la política de regulación y sus consecuencias

Artículo presentado en el VIII Congreso Latinoamericano de Opinión Pública
Colonia del Sacramento (Uruguay), en el 17 y 19 de octubre de 2018
Autores: Rosario Queirolo, Eliana Álvarez, Lorena Repetto, Jake Bowers

Resumen: La legalización de la marihuana en Uruguay ha sido una de las políticas públicas más controversiales de los últimos años. Incluso más debatida ha sido la implementación de la venta en farmacias del cannabis recreativo legal. A diferencia de los mecanismos previamente establecidos, el autocultivo y los clubes cannábicos, esta iniciativa traslada la comercialización del cannabis a espacios comunes entre todos los ciudadanos, generando una nueva forma de contacto entre consumidores y no consumidores. ¿Cómo afecta ésto las opiniones y actitudes respecto a la aprobación de la medida y sus posibles impactos? Este trabajo utiliza un diseño de investigación de experimento natural, posible dado el modo de implementación de la política. Si bien la incorporación a la venta de marihuana fue intencional, el hecho de vivir cerca de una farmacia vendedora no lo fue. Por lo tanto, la distribución de vecinos de farmacias vendedoras y no vendedoras funciona de manera “as if random”. A partir de este diseño, este trabajo examina la variación entre las opiniones y actitudes de vecinos tratados (farmacias vendedoras) y no tratados (farmacias no vendedoras), antes y después de la implementación de la medida en todo el territorio nacional. Se realizó una encuesta previo al inicio de la venta y otra luego de ella; la muestra incluye 1200 vecinos de 60 farmacias. Las variables resultado incluyen la aprobación de la legalización de la marihuana y de su venta en farmacias, y percepción del impacto en la salud pública, seguridad ciudadana, libertades individuales y combate al narcotráfico. Los hallazgos permiten proporcionar evidencia respecto a la hipótesis del "efecto contacto" (Palamar et al, 2011), según el cual la mayor exposición a la sustancia y el mayor contacto con consumidores genera actitudes más favorables hacia la legalización.


Cannabis consumption and crime victimization in Latin America
Consumo de cannabis y victimización en América Latina

Artículo presentado en el XXXVI Congreso Internacional de la Asociación de Estudios Latinoamericanos (LASA).
Barcelona (España) entre el 23 y el 26 de mayo
Autores: Rosario Queirolo, José Miguel Cruz, y María Fernanda Boidi

Resumen: Este artículo explora si el uso recreativo del cannabis aumenta la probabilidad de ser víctima de un crimen en América Latina. El trabajo encuentra evidencia empírica de que el consumo de cannabis está relacionado con la victimización por delincuencia sólo en Jamaica y atribuye esa relación al hecho de que la distribución de cannabis está fuertemente asociada a grupos delictivos violentos.


Why Uruguay legalized marijuana? A window of opportunity in the security agenda
Por qué Uruguay legalizó la marihuana? Una ventana de oportunidad en la agenda de seguridad

Artículo presentado en el XXXVI Congreso Internacional de la Asociación de Estudios Latinoamericanos (LASA).
Barcelona (España) entre el 23 y el 26 de mayo
Autores: Cecilia Rossel, Rosario Queirolo, Eliana Álvarez y Lorena Repetto

Resumen: El trabajo analiza el mecanismo causal que explica la presentación del proyecto de ley que legaliza el mercado de la marihuana en Uruguay y lo transforma en el primer país del mundo con un modelo totalmente regulado por la marihuana (desde la producción hasta el consumo y la distribución).


The Impact of Marihuana Sale at Pharmacies on Users’ Stigmatization & Regulation’s Approval
El impacto de la venta de marihuana en farmacias en la estigmatización de usuarios y la aprobación de la regulación

Artículo presentado en la 13th Conferencia de la International Society for the Study of Drug Policy (ISSDP)
Vancouver, Canadá, entre el 16 y el 18 de mayo 2018
Autores: Jake Bowers, Rosario Queirolo, Eliana Álvarez y Lorena Repetto

Resumen: Este artículo es un es un pre analisis plan de un experimento natural que busca evaluar el impacto que tiene la cercanía con los consumidores de drogas en las actitudes y opiniones de los ciudadanos hacia los consumidores de marihuana y el modelo de regulación implementado en Uruguay en 2013.


Why Uruguay legalized marijuana?
¿Por qué Uruguay legalizó la marihuana?

Artículo presentado en la 13th Conferencia de la International Society for the Study of Drug Policy (ISSDP)
Vancouver, Canadá, entre el 16 y el 18 de mayo 2018
Autores: Cecilia Rossel, Rosario Queirolo, Eliana Álvarez y Lorena Repetto

Resumen: El trabajo analiza el mecanismo causal que explica la presentación del proyecto de ley que legaliza el mercado de la marihuana en Uruguay y lo transforma en el primer país del mundo con un modelo totalmente regulado por la marihuana (desde la producción hasta el consumo y la distribución).

 
Rethinking the Leaf? Support for Marijuana Legalization in Uruguay, the United States and El Salvador
Repensando la hoja. El apoyo a la legalización de la marihuana en Uruguay, Estados Unidos y El Salvador

Artículo presentado en la 9.° Conferencia de la Sociedad Internacional para el Estudio sobre Políticas de Drogas (ISSDP). 
Ghent, Bélgica, del 19 al 22 de Mayo de 2015
Autores: José Miguel Cruz, Rosario Queirolo, María Fernanda Boidi
Resumen: ¿Cuáles son los factores asociados a la aprobación de la legalización de la marihuana? En los últimos tres años, Uruguay y los estados de Colorado y Washington, en Estados Unidos, han legalizado la producción, la comercialización y el consumo de la marihuana recreativa. Estas medidas han generado un importante debate sobre la legalización. Aunque el camino de la legalización y la regulación ha sido diferente en Uruguay y Estados Unidos, estos casos proveen de una excelente oportunidad para explorar la relación entre la implementación de la política de drogas y las opiniones públicas favorables a la legalización en dos contextos muy diferentes. Utilizando datos del Barómetro de las Américas del 2014, encuestas realizadas en Uruguay y Estados Unidos, este artículo examina las visiones ciudadanas sobre la regulación de la marihuana y los factores políticos asociados con la aprobación de la legalización. Se muestra que, a pesar de que los niveles de apoyo a la legalización son diferentes en Estados Unidos y Uruguay, existen algunas similitudes en las variables políticas relacionadas a la aprobación de la legalización de la marihuana en ambos países. Leer el artículo completo


Marijuana Consumption Patterns among Frequent Consumers in Montevideo 
Los patrones de consumo de marihuana entre los consumidores frecuentes de Montevideo

Artículo presentado en la 9.° Conferencia de la Sociedad Internacional para el Estudio sobre Políticas de Drogas (ISSDP).
Ghent, Bélgica, del 19 al 22 de Mayo de 2015
Autores: José Miguel Cruz, Rosario Queirolo, María Fernanda Boidi
Resultados: Este artículo presenta los resultados de una encuesta a consumidores frecuentes de marihuana en Uruguay, la cual representa una línea de base a través de la cual medir posteriores cambios de comportamiento influidos por la nueva regulación. Los consumidores frecuentes comenzaron a experimentar con marihuana mucho antes de alcanzar la edad legal para hacerlo, con una edad promedio de la primera experiencia menor en los más jóvenes. Estos consumidores utilizan más de un método de adquisición de marihuana, con una predominancia indisputable de medios ilegales de acceso. Los consumidores de marihuana apoyan ampliamente la regulación, pero una gran porción de ellos se muestran reacios al registro. Leer el artículo completo 


Inventado Caminos: El camino de la legalización de la marihuana en Uruguay

Preparado para presentar en el Congreso de la Asociación de Estudios Latinoamericanos (LASA).
San Juan, Puerto Rico del 27 al 30 de Mayo de 2015.
Autores: Astrid Arrarás y Emily D. Bello-Prado
Resumen: En 2013, Uruguay se convirtió en el primer país en regularizar el mercado de marihuana. Este artículo describe el marco legal internacional que regula las drogas, así como también la Ley 19.172 de Uruguay que legaliza la marihuana. Aún más, estudia los desafíos domésticos para la completa implementación de la nueva ley y el posible impacto internacional de la regulación del cannabis en Uruguay. Nuestro argumento principal es que, mientras el camino hacia la legalización del cannabis es complejo e incierto, la experiencia de Uruguay está ampliando el debate global acerca de las políticas de drogas. Inclusive, Uruguay ha encontrado una interpretación alternativa de la ley internacional, basada en la reducción de daños y el enfoque de derechos humanos. Mientras esta nación está violando las convenciones internacionales, el experimento uruguayo con la marihuana encarna un cambio de paradigma que puede acarrear resultados positivos - pero también puede generar consecuencias indeseadas. En última instancia, el balance entre ambos influirá en cómo esta legalización impacte tanto en Uruguay como en el mundo. Leer artículo completo